MEN’S STYLE: DRESS UP DENIM.

MEN’S STYLE: DRESS UP DENIM

 

 

 

Hello 🙌

Hope everyone is enjoying their weekend 🙂

In the words of Elio Fiorucci,

“Denim is a love that never fades.”

Denim is more popular now than ever due to its versatility, durability and comfort. For most of us – men and women alike – denim has become the centre of our wardrobe. Each one of us has our favorite pair of blue jeans that feels like second skin. Jeans are a smart, sensible choice and you do not have to give up on your favorite pair to dress stylishly.

✒Here are six easy summer outfit ideas for men to look sharp in blue jeans –

1. Jeans + Shirt.

Style Tip: If you are a conservative dresser, the best pair of jeans for you is a straight legged, well fitted (not skinny), neat (no wash/ distress), dark colored pair of jeans.

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Striped Shirt + Dark Denim

2. Jeans + Plain Crew Tee.

Style Tip: Pair a close fit plain crew neck tee, in a neutral color, with dark denim for a simple yet stylish look. Wear with tan suede shoes to smarten the look.

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Grey Pocket Tee + Jeans

3. Jeans + Suit Jacket.

Style Tip: The formal feel of a grey suit jacket provides a deliberate contrast to the casual feel of jeans. Wear with a tucked in Oxford shirt and tan accessories for a dapper look.

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Grey Jacket + Light Wash Denim

4. Jeans + Striped Tee.

Style Tip: Channel a nautical preppy look with a classic striped t-shirt, cuffed jeans and slip-on boat shoes. Add a jacket in a contrasting shade of blue to make the outfit stand-out.

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Striped Tee + Light Wash Denim

5. Jeans + Chambray Shirt.

Style Tip: The denim on denim trend is huge this year. One of the easiest ways to wear it is to use a light denim/ chambray shirt as a jacket. Complete the look with white tee and sneakers.

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Chambray + White Tee + Jeans

6. Jeans + Blazer.

Style Tip: Keep the blazer pretty slim to avoid a boxy look. Pair with a printed shirt worn untucked and tie-up lace Oxfords for a casual vibe.

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Brown Blazer + Printed Shirt + Jeans

Remember, when in doubt, WEAR DENIM. 💙

Do you own a favorite pair of blue jeans?

What is your go-to denim style?

You can also browse wearable men’s style ideas at: My Pinterest Page.

And follow me on social media;

Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/ayeniviktor_

Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/ayeniviktor_

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/Avfashionworld

THANK YOU 💕💕.

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7 THINGS YOU SHOULD NEVER WEAR TO A WEDDING.

7 Things You Should Never Wear To A Wedding

A little disclaimer before we begin. This beginner’s guide is not for the traditional Indian wedding with the traditional desi attire.

Most people believe that only women turn to bridezillas or zombie vampires as they fuss over every aspect of the wedding especially the way they look, whether it is their own wedding, their best friend’s, office colleague’s, relatives near or distant or they are just a plus one. But this belief does not imply that the men get a get-out-of-jail free card and are let off the hook to DRESS and behave as they please.

Men too require to plan their ensemble depending upon the location, venue, and theme of the wedding and their relationship to the happy couple. Of course the general tone is formal but still it is better to consider all scenarios while preparing.

TO HELP MEN TO MAKE MORE RATIONAL AND WISER DECISIONS WE HAVE COMPILED A LIST OF 7 THINGS YOU SHOULD NOT BE CAUGHT DEAD IN AT A WEDDING.

1. JEANS:

However low key the wedding, even your most expensive, uber cool and super stylish denims won’t make the cut. Not even with a blazer or a sport coat. Go for dress PANTS instead.

2. TUXEDO:

Confused. This is because the Groom and his guys in the wedding party are generallyDRESSED in a Tux. It is like girls can not wear white to the wedding. The bride should be the only one wearing it. Same rules apply here. Go for a formal suit instead. It would be really cool if you can enquire in advance what colors the wedding party is sporting on the wedding day and avoid those too.

3. SHORTS:

Even if it is a breach wedding please avoid wearing shorts. If the weather is too warm or the wedding is at a beach then opt for linen PANTS or light weight chinos.

4. OSTENTATIOUS CLOTHING:

Avoid

  • Band T-shirts
  • HolidaySWEATERS
  • Oversized clothing
  • Loud printed ties
  • Angsty/Slogan/Graphic Grafiti T-shirts
  • Bedazzled anything

5. SWEATPANTS & HOODIES:

Avoid joggers too. I am sure you can stay without them for a day. However athletic or fitness freak you are abstain from flaunting it. Even runaway brides are DRESSED elegantly.

6. AVOID ALL BLACK:

The monochrome look is a classic but all black is best reserved for funerals and other grave occasions. It is a wedding for heaven’s sake, lighten up and add a dash of color to make your monochrome look pop.

7. ATHLETIC SHOES:

A strict No No. Go for DRESS SHOES, brogues, and loafers.

6 Rules for a Perfectly Tailored Suit.

Because there are few things worse than a bad one.

Putting on a great suit is transformative. Your shoulders are broadened; your lines, longer and leaner; your waist, that much trimmer. You look great, you feel great. That is, assuming you got the right suit and had it properly tailored. As any man who’s spent an evening in a boxy rental knows, there are very few things as good as a great suit. There are—in the sartorial sense at least—fewer things worse than a bad one. Since even a modestly priced off-the-rack number can look like a million bucks with the right nips and tucks, we’re here to help with six essential rules for getting a perfectly tailored suit.

1. Hem Your Trousers

This is the number one place most guys go wrong when it comes to tailored clothing. Even A-List stars—who should know better—have been known to leave things far too long. Though you don’t necessarily need to embrace the ankle-baring aesthetic espoused by designers like Thom Browne, all that extra length isn’t doing anything but making you look shorter and sloppier. Opt for a very small break (the edge of your pants should just brush the tops of your shoes) for a look that’ll stand the test of time, but still feels modern.

2. Make Sure the Shoulders Fit

The shoulders of your suit jacket should feel like they’re hugging your own. If they’re noticeably tight, the jacket is too small. And if the shoulder seams are sagging past the natural line of your body, like they do for all too many workaday types, it’s too big. The shoulders are the one place that even expert tailors are hesitant to mess with: It’s difficult, expensive, and can ruin your suit. Nearly everything else can be altered, but if the shoulders aren’t spot on, it’s time to return it to the rack.

3. Hem Your Sleeves

Slightly less pervasive than the problem of pooling trousers—but no less pernicious—is that of over-long sleeves. Your jacket sleeve should end a quarter-inch to a half-inch before your shirt sleeve does. All the better to show a sliver of cuff. If your jacket sleeve is hitting your knuckles, it’s way too long. This is an easy and cheap fix if the buttons on the cuffs aren’t functional; your tailor will simply trim from the cuff up and then move them. If the cuffs feature working buttons, it’s a bit more labor-intensive and pricey. The sleeve has to be taken up from the shoulder. Still, better than the knuckle-grazing alternative.

4. Watch for Collar Gap

You might not be able to see it, but everyone around you will. The collar of your suit jacket, if not properly fitted to your neck, will sit away from your shirt collar, leaving a gap. This can happen for any number of reasons, and if it’s not too severe, a tailor can usually fix it. But anything more than a small gap can be a problem. Watch out when you’re buying, and unless you’ve got a particularly skilled tailor that you trust completely, steer clear.

5. Take in the Waist of Your Jacket

Many suit jackets are made with a “democratic” cut, which is a nice way of saying they’re designed to accommodate men of a certain girth around the midsection. If you aren’t one of these men, it also means that your jacket will look boxy until you have your tailor take it in at the waist. Don’t get too aggressive about it, though. Remember, you still need to be able to move in the thing. Aim for being able to comfortably fit a closed fist between your jacket and shirt when the top button is closed.

6. Slim the Sleeves and Taper the Trousers

A lot of guys have tuned into the idea that going narrower on the pants is a great way to elongate the lines of a suit and create a tailored silhouette. Take a page from their book and taper your own trousers. One thing you might not have thought of is doing the same for the sleeves of the jacket. It’s a little more complicated because your tailor will have to deal with the lining, but it’ll make for a much more polished look in the long run. So, you know, worth it.

 

Introducing the New London Tailors: Thom Sweeney.

How one small business is updating traditional English tailoring for a new generation.

For Luke Sweeney, the decision to get into the business of making and designing clothes wasn’t some grand philosophical one. “For me, it was purely visual,” explains Sweeney, who co-founded London tailoring brand Thom Sweeney with Thom Whiddett in 2007.

Still, as he and Whiddett prepare for a U.S. trunk show at New York’s Bergdorf Goodman on September 25th and 26th, Sweeney notes that there’s some family heritage in the mix. “My dad, my family, were always in the clothing industry. And every time I saw tailors working in the cutting room, or coat makers making jackets, everyone looked smart, everyone looked cool, and I just wanted to be a part of it. I didn’t know anything about the business side of it, I just knew I wanted to be a part of it because everyone looked so great.”

Sweeney got his start working in fabrics and measuring for an established tailor, Timothy Everest, who trained under the legendary—and legendarily quirky—Tommy Nutter. It was at Everest’s bespoke atelier where he met Whiddett. The latter man, for his part, fell into the world of bespoke almost by happenstance. While working for Esquire UK, he went along on an interview and met Everest. And things fell into place. Soon, he was working as a cutter, tracing and cutting patterns for garments. “I love the industry and wanted to learn the trade,” says Whiddett. “I wanted to kind of soak it all up there, and then we could do our own thing later on.”

The business did grow, though. And by 2014—after years of customer requests for ready-to-wear options—Thom Sweeney decided to break out of the bespoke world and introduce a seasonal collection to complement their custom offerings. It launched exclusively with online retailer Mr Porter, with whom Sweeney and Whiddett already had a relationship: Mr Porter’s editor-in-chief, Jeremy Langley, was a bespoke customer. The tailoring duo was confident that it was the right outlet.

“We wanted to keep it tight,” explains Whiddett. “We don’t want to be sold everywhere. We want to, in an ideal world, pick and choose the right partners who can buy and sell it correctly, and with Mr Porter, we were really confident that they were the right guys to do it.”

Now in its fourth season, Thom Sweeney’s ready-to-wear collection is the natural outgrowth of its bespoke business. Marked by rich fabrics, muted colors, and a house cut that’s a little slimmer, shorter, and softer than traditional English tailoring, it’s the kind of stuff that even guys who don’t have to wear a suit every day can live in. It is also impeccably tailored, even straight off the hanger. Turns out obsessing over things like armhole height, jacket length, and lapel width for seven years is a pretty good way to iron out all the details so crucial to well-fitting clothing.

“You have to find a garment with those details,” notes Sweeney, “but not gimmicky or in-fashion. You try and create pieces that you can take out of the wardrobe in two or three seasons’ time and they still look current and modern.” To that end, though, both tailors look to the fashion world for inspiration from time to time, they eschew the capital “F” designation—and the often over-tight jackets that grace so many runways.

“I have nightmares about it,” says Whiddett of the so-called fashion jacket. “We always have our customer in mind, and I think our customer doesn’t really buy into that. I think if you’re going to wear something that costs you decent money and last a while, it should be made well. That’s really our focus.”

That doesn’t mean frumpy, though. Thom Sweeney may be informed by the classics, but the end goal is to create garments that are modern, cool, and impeccably constructed. The duo credits their ability to toe this line as the main reason for their success. Says Sweeney: “I think that’s why we’ve really tapped into a market. There aren’t many young tailors doing it the old way with a modern take.”

3 Places In The World That I Want To Visit.

3 Places In The World That I Want To Visit

Traveling has been on my mind for months. Being able to change locations and live somewhere else around the world is life changing. People that travel often have a lot to say about it, traveling is one of the best feelings. Now that there  is social media people are able to see travelers from around the world show their experiences to millions of people. Most people spend half of their life traveling and working at the same time, being able to do this in this day of age is amazing and I feel that more people should start traveling more frequently. A few months ago I started considering traveling soon. I have been in California my whole life and the only place that I have been out of state is Las Vegas, but I live in Southern California so going to Las Vegas and back isn’t quite the adventure that I’m looking for.

Places That I Want To Visit 

Tokyo, Japan


Japan has been on my list for a while, actually ever since I was a kid I had always wanted to visit Japan. The culture is amazing to me and I’d love to be a tourist one day in Tokyo, I had many friends that have been there and they always tell me that it’s one of the greatest experiences they had.

Paris, France 


Paris is every travelers desination, I would love to visit soon and even live there for a few months. I learned the French language so I would be able to communicate with people there.

London, United Kingdom 


Growing up, I watched a lot of tv shows based in London which made me fall in love with the UK. Traveling around the UK has always been a place that I knew for sure that I would love to visit in the near future.

Visiting other countries around the world is something that I really have a desire to do. Many of my friends and family have traveled, I don’t think that it would be long until I will be able to start traveling and really getting a chance to see and experience the world and learn new things!
Have you ever wanted to travel is traveling? 

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Thanks for reading!

Meet H&M’s Design Award Winner.

 

CENTRAL SAINT MARTINS graduate Richard Quinn was awarded with the annual H&M Design Award in London yesterday, granting him €50,000, a year’s mentorship, and the chance to develop pieces from his winning collection to be sold in the high-street store.

Richard Quinn
Richard Quinn jury 
“We all fell in love with Richard. He has a clear vision for his brand, and a real wow factor in his collections. Richard is deeply creative, with a very holistic view of the environment, and he’s a worthy winner of the H&M Design Award 2017,” said Ann-Sofie Johansson, H&M’s creative advisor.

Johansson was joined on the jury by Imran Amed, editor-in-chief of Business of Fashion, Pernille Teisbaek, founder and creative director of Social Zoo, Zanita Whittington, creative director of Azalle and Zanita Studio, Yasmin Sewell, fashion director of Style.com, Hannah Jinkins, winner of the H&M Design Award 2016 and Margareta van den Bosch, creative advisor to H&M.

The judges were most impressed with 26-year-old Quinn’s fabrics, which he prints himself using ethical processes in his studio in east London, where he plans to open a creative space to become an inspiring centre for other young designers in the capital.

“It means so much to win the H&M Design Award,” said Quinn. “I want to create my own collection, as well as offer my generation a creative hub, supporting real craft in London.”

Quinn beat seven other finalists to the top spot. Constance Blackaller, Yu Li Song, Alex Huang, Amir Marc, Max Luo, YuTyng Chiu and Chen Peng were all highly commended and were each awarded €5,000.

Quinn with the jury
Quinn with the jury

FOOTSTEPS

  • It’s not a movie…
  • It’s not a film
  • Its his life here to begin
  • Well the days of life
  • Where no inspiration
  • No desire to do something even no smile on his face
  • When someone knocks the doors and enter’s his life
  • Then he see she starts walking towards his life
  • Her way to look life is different from mine
  • When he thinks about his past
  • She tells look towards future what is past
  • Its her way to see the thinks that never done yesterday do it today
  • She is the inspiration of tomorrow
  • She is a motivation to be followed
  • Her footsteps are different from other
  • Just He want to follow her
  • When he was watching a dream in the night
  • It’s a nightmare
  • When he needs a day
  • Just a light came
  • When he compare his footprints
  • His footprints are giants
  • She says look at mine
  • When you see any footprints
  • You just hold and flashes tight you will always reminds my footprints
  • Just forget every time of sorrow and follow each and every happy moment in your life
  • When you see any sorrow just follow footprints of mine.      #Inspirations 🤔☝✍.